How to NOT Sound Like a Salesperson

16 May

Stopx

Before you meet a prospect, or even speak to them, you are probably trying to catch them via email or LinkedIn (or in some type of written format). You may get lucky reaching the decision maker through a call or knock on their door – but usually it’s not that easy if you have any type of complex solution.

Here are two examples of how I was approached by salespeople this week:

#1) Hey Drew! I’m curious – how long have you been a coach and who is your target audience? I ask because I see Business Coaches being incredibly successful here on LinkedIn in terms of finding new clients and winning new business. The key is replicating the real life, 1-on-1 relationship building you do with prospective clients here on LinkedIn. (I have a whole system I teach on how this works and the Business Coaches I’ve shown it to have had great success.) Happy to share some free tips and strategies if you’re interested. I can send over some free resources. And if you’re not interested, no worries at all. Joe.

Good:

  • He started with a question.

Bad: 

  • He starts out with “Hey” (too casual) and an exclamation point. Salespeople shouldn’t use !’s in an opener. It’s salesy.
  • The question is followed by a bunch of “blah, blah and blah” (too long).
  • Joe tells me in detail, his opinion of why he’s awesome.
  • There’s no call to action at the close.

#2) Drew! I am doing a giving experiment… What’s a challenge or question you’re facing right now related to Facebook Ads or acquiring more users for your SaaS company? My agency helps numerous SaaS companies to dramatically increase user acquisition with Facebook Ads. How can someone like me help you? I would love to help solve your challenges. Be in touch, Aaron

Good:
  • It’s short enough that I read it all the way through upon receiving it.
  • There is a promise that Aaron may reach out again… but it’s still not necessarily a call to action.
Bad: 
  • EEEEEEK – exclamation point.
  • “Doing a giving” is a weird start and I had to take the time re-read it to understand his message.
  • I’m not a SaaS company.
Email Tips:
  1. Keep them short and sweet. Greeting, 2-3 sentences, a call to action and signature.
  2. Make sure your messages are clear so an 8th grader can understand it (the Star Tribune is written at a 5th grade reading level and the Wall Street Journal at an 8th grade level).
  3. Make sure you understand your prospect’s company and role.
  4. Don’t use exclamation points when prospecting.
  5. Ideally, get an introduction – or approach them with some commonality through LinkedIn. Now it’s a WARM lead which tremendously increases your odds of a response.

Note that I generally love exclamation points! I literally remove a couple of them every time I re-read a message before sending – as I typically have 3-4 of them. It makes us sound dumber and too familiar to a stranger. I use them with my internal employees and long-term clients, but not my prospects.

Whatever you say, keep it short and sweet – or they may not even read it. If you’ve established them as a strong prospect, follow-up 5-6 times afterwards (emails or phone calls). Persistence often pays off.

Good Luck! ~Drew

http://www.blueoctopusllc.com

drew@blueoctopusllc.com

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